Table 6-2c: U.S. Merchandise Trade With Canada and Mexico by Mode of Transportation (Tonnage) (Thousands of metric tons)


 

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Notes:

  United States

Imports from Canada: The U.S. Customs Service began to require shipping weight for U.S. imports from Canada by all modes of transportation in 1990. However, it did not become possible to disaggregate the land modes (road, rail and pipeline) until 1994. In addition, transshipments cannot be disaggregated from 1995 and 1996 land modes data, rendering these years’ figures incomparable to data from subsequent years. For more information, see the technical documentation.

Imports from Mexico: The U.S. Customs Service began to require shipping weight for U.S. imports from Mexico by land modes of transportation (road, rail and pipeline) in April 1995. In addition, transshipments cannot be disaggregated from 1995 and 1996 land modes data, rendering these years’ figures incomparable to data from subsequent years. For more information, see the technical documentation.

Road, rail and pipeline exports: The United States currently does not report weight for export shipments to Canada or Mexico for these land modes of transportation. The U.S. Department of Transportation, Research and Innovative Technology Administration, Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) estimates the weight of exports for truck, rail, pipeline, mail and other and unknown modes based on the import weight-to-value ratios that vary by country, mode, and commodity. The import weight-to-value ratios at the six, four, and two-digit HS code commodity detail are applied. Since the weight-to-value ratio of a given commodity drastically change from one year to another, BTS removed the irregular components (outliers) of the import ratios to produce a consistent and reliable export weight estimates.

Due to differences in the methodology, the export weight estimates of truck, rail, pipeline, mail and other modes for earlier years (before 2007) are not comparable to the current export weight estimates. Import components may not add totals due to the inclusion of other modes not listed. 2010 data for pipeline exports to Mexico is not comparable to data from previous years due to a change in the methodology.

One short ton = approximately 0.90718474 metric tons.

 

Sources:
  United States

Total trade, air and water: 1990 – 2003: U.S. Department of Commerce, U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division, FT920 reports, http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/statistics/press-release. 2004 – current: U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, TransBorder Freight Data, available at http://www.bts.gov/programs/international/transborder.
Road, rail, and pipeline: U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, TransBorder Freight Data, available at http://transborder.bts.gov/programs/international/transborder.